Read The Essence of Christianity. by Ludwig Feuerbach Online

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Title : The Essence of Christianity.
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 0270016929
ISBN13 : 978-0270016925
Format Type : Audio Book
Language : Deutsch
Publisher : Wentworth Press 25 Juli 2018
Number of Pages : 444 Seiten
File Size : 783 KB
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Essence of Christianity. Reviews

  • Svein Olav Nyberg
    2018-11-13 12:43

    I read this book in search of the philosophical roots of Max Stirner, author of The Ego and Its Own. For this purpose, the book is excellent; you can see where Max Stirner came from on a number of issues that had hitherto seemed a bit cloudy to me - both in what Stirner reacts to and what he has drawn on.The book is, however, a very compelling read in its own right as well. Feuerbach takes us through literally the whole catalogue of Christian belief, and shows us how each item of belief is explained at least as well - or perhaps even better - as an anthropomorphism rather than as a supernatural manifestation. It must be said, though, that each single one of his arguments on their own do not lead to such a conviction. Just like you are not convinced that the dice are loaded by getting 6 once or twice, you will not be convinced if anthropomorphism fits the bill of Christianity in a few single instances. However - analogously with the dice - when you strike 6 nearly every time, you will be convinced that the dice are loaded.If I have a criticism of Feuerbach, it is that after he has revealed the Essence of Christianity as being the worship of Man, he keeps the essence and only discards the accidental properties of Christianity, i.e. the supernaturalism. This was also what Max Stirner called him on. But my disagreement does not mean a disparagement of the value of the book. So I recommend it as a read.

  • Svein Olav Nyberg
    2018-10-31 08:50

    I read this book in search of the philosophical roots of Max Stirner, author of The Ego and Its Own. For this purpose, the book is excellent; you can see where Max Stirner came from on a number of issues that had hitherto seemed a bit cloudy to me - both in what Stirner reacts to and what he has drawn on.The book is, however, a very compelling read in its own right as well. Feuerbach takes us through literally the whole catalogue of Christian belief, and shows us how each item of belief is explained at least as well - or perhaps even better - as an anthropomorphism rather than as a supernatural manifestation. It must be said, though, that each single one of his arguments on their own do not lead to such a conviction. Just like you are not convinced that the dice are loaded by getting 6 once or twice, you will not be convinced if anthropomorphism fits the bill of Christianity in a few single instances. However - analogously with the dice - when you strike 6 nearly every time, you will be convinced that the dice are loaded.If I have a criticism of Feuerbach, it is that after he has revealed the Essence of Christianity as being the worship of Man, he keeps the essence and only discards the accidental properties of Christianity, i.e. the supernaturalism. This was also what Max Stirner called him on. But my disagreement does not mean a disparagement of the value of the book. So I recommend it as a read.

  • None
    2018-10-19 12:56

    In one of the most convincing theological arguments for athiesm of all time, The Essence of Christianity was written in a period of heavy religous tension in Germany. Through Fererbach's lengthy assertions and occaisonally flowery prose, the belief in a God seperate from man is systematically destroyed, albeit with occasionally thin argument. Feuerbach contends that religion is an expression of humanity, and that the collective potential for reason, affection, and will is the true essence of religion. He therefore does not contend with many of the main tenants of Lutheranism as they apply to the anthropological essence of religion. He argues that the belief in God is merely a misdirected belief in humankind. This work is an important historical and social one as the idea of human supremicy sets the stage for Frederick Engles and the Marxist era of Russia. It is interesting reading and creates for myriad new ways of percieving specific aspects of religion and humanity-- a must for anyone interested in any sort of theology.

  • Jost Ambau
    2018-10-18 15:39

    I'm not really a "scholar," but I can't help but "think" that Feuerbach is being deliberately vague and self-contradictory. My men's group read this for the month of February, and we all disagree with him that "Love" is "God"--if this were (epistomologically) "true," why would we write "Love" at the end of letters? Wouldn't we just write "God"? Guten nacht, Ludwig!

  • hunter green
    2018-11-11 07:40

    A classic which so lovingly deals with the very finest of human qualities that before the last pages you know you might be an atheist and an admirer of The Christ, too. So clearly written in the German language that the translation job by "George Eliot" was an event which lost nothing. You remember George Eliot (Mary Ann Evans) as the author of "The Mill on the Floss" and "Silas Marner" . This book explains exactly what it means to be born into a culture altered by Christianity. It might be good to start the book about one third of the way in as the first third is thin gruel unless you have philosophical training. Once upon a time, this book was very hard to find. The book is so wonderful, you tend not to keep it in your library because one gives it away, but buy again it when you need an emotional lift. It is a rigorous empirical treatment of the anthropomorphic and at the same time encorporating the celebration of the accomplishment. The best minds of Christendom worked on this for about 1000 years, and it shows. Should be a part of a modern canon. Most graceful writing.

  • C. K. Wedemeyer
    2018-11-10 14:39

    Most of the positive reviews of this title seem to be responding to the work itself: i.e. the text of the translation of the book by Ludwig Feuerbach. With that assessment, I would concur. He had an obvious and explicit impact on the thinking of Marx and other post-Hegelian thinkers and is an interesting thinker in his own right (more than he is given credit for).However, this is a TERRIBLE edition of the work. The text is not well-edited: there are clear typos, missing or erroneous punctuation, etc. There is none of the standard bibliographical information: place, publisher, date. They don't even give credit to the translator of the work.I think these various problems are related: it looks like a sloppy job of OCR scanning of an out-of-copyright work for which there is still a small, but ongoing demand by university students by some kind of on-demand publishing outfit. It's a shame they didn't do a decent job of preparing a proper book for publication.I recommend looking for a used copy of one of the older editions, such as that with the essays by Barth and Niebuhr.

  • Jacob S. Thielman
    2018-11-17 08:34

    That George Eliot's name is misspelled on the front cover should probably be a clue. This is an awful edition — basically a xerox. The entire bottom line of a footnote is simply cut off (p.27). At $11, this book is way overpriced.

  • nasser
    2018-11-09 08:47

    exellent

  • jim irwin
    2018-11-16 10:28

    This is a junk version, missing letters and badly formatted. A rip-off.